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  • Writer's pictureBritany Libutty

Peptides for Healing

Updated: May 18, 2022

Hi friends, today I'm posting about peptides.


You may say, what in the heck are peptides?


Peptides are chains of amino acids (or proteins) that support every function your body does.

They chain together in differing amounts, and often are referred to as short chain, medium chain, or long chain.

Peptides naturally occur in your body. Some of them are particularly helpful in moving along the healing processes of the body.

When you are chronically ill, peptides can be another tool in your toolbox to help you recover, so let's explore that here.


My interest in peptides began basically when my doctor told me they were another thing to try, because of the state of my immune system. I was willing to try anything, and always tried things with an open mind, while educating myself about them as I was taking them.


For me, TA Peptides seemed to be a good fit for my situation. My white blood cell count plummeted as my body tried to take on the large toxin and infection burdens I have in my body due to mold, mycotoxins and the damage they inflicted upon my immune system- (which allowed for more bad things to proliferate further without being kept in check.) I also have Th1/Th2 imbalance and autoimmune issues, so basically...


The bad guys like my body and are trying to stay in there wreck shit up.


I'll jump to the Peptide I know most about first, TAs.

TA Peptides benefit the thymus- as they are aptly named Thymosin Alpha 1 (Ta1).


A quick couple of notes on the thymus- the thymus makes white blood cells called T lymphocytes (also called T cells). These are an important part of the body's immune system, which helps us to fight infection.


Thymosin alpha 1 is a peptide naturally occurring in the thymus that has long been recognized for modifying, enhancing, and restoring immune function.



Some benefits of TA Peptides:


  • Exhibit antibacterial and antifungal properties.

  • Increase vaccine effectiveness.

  • Enhance the function of certain immune cells.

  • Help eradicate the unhealthy cells and stop infection.

  • Support immune system


How do Peptides modulate the immune system?

"Peptides and peptidomimetics can function as immunomodulating agents by either blocking the immune response or stimulating the immune response to generate tolerance."


Read more here:


Read more here:


An imbalance between T helper cell (Th)1 and (Th)2-like cytokines has been described in several autoimmune diseases. This shows that the immune system isn't functioning in balance, and needs to be corrected. TA peptides may a thing to consider discussing with your dr. if you have autoimmune issues.


"Although the immune system is well regulated, autoimmunity occurs when autoreactive immune cells are triggered to activate their responses against self-tissues. This happens due to a lack of immunotolerance or to a breakdown of the mechanism that controls immune tolerance, resulting in failure of the host system to distinguish self from non-self cells. Autoimmune diseases may affect a single organ or multiple organs."



Read more about Th1 and Th2 here:



I got my first vial and began taking my dosages every day of the week as prescribed, then later on moved to 5 of every 7 days. I won't share my dosage amount because we are all bio-individual and I feel that we need to consult with a professional about what we should be trying, how much, and why.


I've been on TA Peptides now for a year and a half and although I unfortunately need to occasionally ration them due to cost of treating a family from mold illness and co., I can always see immediate negative effects when I am off of them.

I get way more run down, I get 'sick' more often, and once I refill and start taking them correctly- my body's ability to fight feels much better and I recover.


Safe to say that for me (and one of my children), they are a core player in my recovery at this point still and for some time to come.



A wonderful place I got more knowledge about peptides in general and peptide therapy was on a podcast I listened to on my walk tonight:

The Beautifully Broken Podcast hosted by Freddie Kimmel (shout out to another Buffalo, NY native), who invited on Nathalie Niddam to discuss Peptides.


linked here:



It was an excellent hour for learning. I encourage you to listen if you are interested in learning more about different types of peptides

-not just the one I covered above-

and the AMAZING effects they can have on your body and healing.



Many kinds of Peptides can be useful during recovery from mold. Some options to discuss with your doctor are:

RG3 Synapsin,

BPC157 (Body Protection Compound)

VIP (Viscoactive Intestinal Peptide). -------(The "Champion" peptide of Dr. Shoemaker)

TA Peptides


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More about VIP:


What is VIP?

Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a substance found throughout the body.

The highest levels are normally found in the nervous system and gut. It is considered to be a neuroendocrine peptide.

Low levels are seen in mold illness patients. It is also low in people with chemical sensitivities.

VIP's Job In The Body

VIP, is a 28-amino acid (aa) peptide that acts as a neuroendocrine hormone, putative neurotransmitter and cytokine. The presence of VIP and specific VIP binding sites in defined pathways in the brain indicate that it may play an important role in central nervous system (CNS) function. VIP is now widely accepted as a co-transmitter, with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, of nonadrenergic, noncholinergic relaxation of both vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle. VIP may also promote neuronal survival and regulate glycogen metabolism in the cerebral cortex. VIP stimulates prolactin secretion from the pituitary and catecholamine release from the adrenal medulla. In the immune system, VIP regulates T cell traffic and inhibits mitogen-activated proliferation of T cells by inhibiting interleukin-2 production. Other actions of VIP include stimulation of electrolyte secretion and protection against oxidant injury.

VIP is also thought to play a role in neurodevelopment and in neuroprotection following injury to the central nervous system. NAP (davunetide), an active fragment of the VIP-inducted neuroprotective protein ADNP (activity-dependent neuroprotective protein) is in clinical development for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

This neuroendocrine peptide is distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as in peripheral tissues, such as various areas of the skin. It is a nueromodulator and neurotransmitter.

VIP and the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) play diverse and important roles in the central nervous system, with functions in the control of circadian rhythms, learning and memory, anxiety and responses to stress and brain injury. VIP and PACAP play important roles in the control of immunity and inflammation, the control of pancreatic insulin secretion, the release of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla and as co-transmitters in autonomic and sensory neurons.

VIP is now widely accepted as a co-transmitter, with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, of nonadrenergic, noncholinergic relaxation of both vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle and with acetylcholine in exocrine glands VIP may also promote neuronal survival and regulate glycogen metabolism in the cerebral cortex. VIP stimulates prolactin secretion from the pituitary and catecholamine release from the adrenal medulla In the immune system, VIP regulates T cell traffic and inhibits mitogen-activated proliferation of T cells by inhibiting IL-2 production Other actions of VIP include stimulation of electrolyte secretion and protection against oxidant injury.

Receptors affected strongly by VIP are VPAC1 and VPAC2 and to a lesser degree PAC1. The VPAC1 receptor is widely distributed in the CNS, especially in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is also in peripheral tissues including the liver, lung and intestine. The receptor is also in T lymphocytes, smooth muscles in the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and reproductive system.

VIP is released from autonomic and sensory nerve fibers in the skin. VIP-containing nerve fibers as well as VIP receptors have been identified in the skin. VIP released from nerve endings in the epidermis (outer skin layer) binds to its receptor on skin cells called keratinocytes, thereby modulating their function.

VIPs Functions

  • Neuroendocrine hormone

  • Putative neurotransmitter Cytokine

  • Mediates vasodilation

  • lowers arterial blood pressure

  • Increases cardiac output

  • Mediates immunomodulation

  • Mediates mast cell degranulation

  • Helps control or send nerve signals

  • Helps relax certain muscles along the gastrointestinal tract

  • Increases glycogenolysis

  • Helps relax bronchioles, smooth muscle of trachea, stomach and gall bladder.

  • It increases the amount of water and electrolytes released from the pancreas and gut

  • It triggers the release of hormones from the pancreas, gut, and hypothalamus

  • It helps break down fat and glycogen

  • It stimulates bile flow

  • It blocks gastrin, and gastric acid





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More PEPTIDE treatment options are listed here:



Some benefits of many types of Peptides:


1. regulate RNA replications in mitochondria, which are essential for fueling our cells with energy to repair cell damage.

2. stimulate the regeneration of neurons by helping the production of NAD. NAD is one of the essential energy molecules in our cells, and it is necessary for metabolic processes.

3. support the clearing of brain inflammation and inflammation in general

4. help the immune system re-regulate.



How can you take Peptides?

1. Oral capsules

2. Topical creams or serums

3. Nasal sprays

4. Belly fat injections performed at home or in office

5. Intravenous infusions

6. Ultrasound-guided injections into the injured tendon or sore nerve





There are quite a few I am interested in talking to my doctor about now after listening in the the podcast and I'll let you all know if I try any others.






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